Google Driverless Car

Anyone driving the busiest roads of San Francisco or Los Angeles may have seen a Toyota Prius passing by with a cylinder on the roof. There was a person sitting inside the car, or even two. More surprisingly, none of them were driving the car, not even had their hands of the steering wheel. The cars were still turning on twists, stopping on obstacles and blowing the horn when required! Here is a Fullestop Review about Google Driverless Car and everything that you want to know about it.



Google Driverless Car



Yes folks, we are talking about Google’s new project, the Driverless Car. It’s nothing but a vehicle which can drive itself with the help of artificial intelligence and software. Smart enough to identify the obstacles and to mimic the decisions that a human driver had made.

 

Recently, the company conducted a test drive with seven cars, with a driver to control in unfavourable conditions and a technician to monitor the navigation. Encouragingly, these cars have driven 1,000 miles without human intervention and more than 140,000 miles with slight human control. These miles included some of the curviest and steepest streets in the nation.

 

There are many aspects that show why robot drivers are safer than human drivers. They have 360-degree perception, they never get distracted, sleepy or intoxicated. Road accidents are a significant problem across the world, and it is anticipated that the roads can be a better place if traffic senses are improved. But nothing is perfect, not even computers. They crash, and sometimes they stop responding. The solution to this problem is still unidentified which has somewhere prevented self-driven cars to appear on the roads by now.

 

Looking perfectly fine at the first instance, the driverless car has raised thorny legal issues. According to the current laws, the human must control a car at all times. This cannot be the case if the car is self driven. At some instances when a person can be more sensible than a robot, the car may create some issues. Other big problem that the car has raised is regarding the responsibility in case of any accident. Who will be liable if an accident occurs – the person behind the wheel or the maker of the software?

 

Excited to buy a car after reading all this? Perhaps you are not lucky enough, or at least for now.

Why can’t you own a Google Driverless Car?

The one-word answer is – “the shared economy”. You can use the car as you need it, and then leave it for the next person. Process is simple; just sign up with your Smartphone, they unlock the car for you and you can take it with you. You can keep it for some hours, or say some days. When you are done, the next person picks it up.